British blogger says he’s found world’s worst toilet where walls are used as toilet roll

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A British travel blogger who spent £150,000 and traveled 75,000 miles to over 90 countries to find the world’s worst public toilet says he’s finally found it – in Tajikistan.

Brighton-based writer and blogger Graham Askey – known to friends as the ‘Porcelain King’ – has scanned the world for the most disgusting loos.

After visiting 91 countries and writing numerous blogs about some of the worst examples he’s found, the 58-year-old has now discovered the ‘perfect hellhole’ – a dilapidated tent with walls that double as a toilet roll.

The retired builder says the 5ft-tall toilet in northern Tajikistan is so bad that those desperate enough to use it have to bend over sun-dried poop.

But by far “the most repulsive thing of all,” Askey says, is that her fabric walls are used as shared toilet paper.

He says some sections of “walls” were ripped off and thrown on the cabin floor. There is also a danger of disturbing the deadly snakes and fearless rats that have all taken up residence in the nearby rocks.

Toilets in Tajikistan’s Ayni region, at the western end of the Pamirs and not far from the Afghan border, are so vile that locals refuse to use them unless they are ‘absolutely desperate’, says Mr Askey. .

Askey, an avowed “squatter watcher”, visited hundreds of public toilets on six of the world’s seven continents before crowning Tajikistan’s outhouses as the worst of them all.

Graham Askey estimates he spent up to £150,000 traveling the world and photographing his public toilets

According to Mr Askey, it is the 'worst toilets' in the world, which is near the Afghan border in Tajikistan

According to Mr Askey, it is the ‘worst toilets’ in the world, which is near the Afghan border in Tajikistan

Mr Askey has visited 91 countries in his quest to assess the world's public toilets - and says all those listed in his new book pose a serious health risk

Mr Askey has visited 91 countries in his quest to assess the world’s public toilets – and says all those listed in his new book pose a serious health risk

This collapsing structure is a makeshift toilet Mr Askey encountered in Bangladesh

This collapsing structure is a makeshift toilet Mr Askey encountered in Bangladesh

A 10ft-tall stilt hut in Indonesia also made the list thanks to its death-defying walkway

A 10ft-tall stilt hut in Indonesia also made the list thanks to its death-defying walkway

He’s included 36 of the “c**ppiest c**ppers” he’s encountered in his new book Toilets of the Wild Frontier, which hits shelves this week.

Other public toilets that made its ‘c**p list’ included a sink in Bangladesh and a bathtub holding ‘liters of numbers one and two’ in China – with the stopper left on.

A 10-foot-tall stilt hut in Indonesia also made the list thanks to its death-defying walkway, as did a wooden chair with a built-in toilet seat in Benin which, perched prominently on a raised platform in the middle of the village, is said by Askey to be the “least privacy-friendly toilet” he has ever encountered.

Mr Askey developed his particular fascination with public toilets – and in particular their poor construction – during his first holiday abroad in Morocco.

He has since visited 91 countries, traveled around 75,000 miles and spent around £150,000 visiting private and public bathrooms around the world.

He only photographed the exterior of the worst toilets he visited to spare people the “vomiting-inducing” contents, and spent the “absolute minimum of time” inside to avoid nausea.

The photos he took garnered thousands of views on his blog “Inside Other Places” which he wrote for the fictional restroom and urinal restoration and design company (“TURDS”).

His unique articles on remote parts of the world became so popular that he decided to collect the best 36 in book form.

This bath, found in China, was filled with

This bath, found in China, was filled with “liters of numbers one and two” according to the travel blogger

These toilets in Uzbekistan are at least solid structures, but still appear on the list of the 36 worst public toilets in the world

These toilets in Uzbekistan are at least solid structures, but still appear on the list of the 36 worst public toilets in the world

For another toilet in Tajikistan, it's the precarious perch she sits on amid the mountains that sees her make the list

For another toilet in Tajikistan, it’s the precarious perch she sits on amid the mountains that sees her make the list

This toilet in Indonesia, located on a raft, empties directly into the water under

This toilet in Indonesia, located on a raft, empties directly into the water under

This bathroom in Benin contains little more than a wooden chair modified to house a toilet seat with a bucket underneath

This bathroom in Benin contains little more than a wooden chair modified to house a toilet seat with a bucket underneath

Although intended as a satirical work, it also aims to highlight the health risk posed by substandard sanitation.

Mr Askey said: “Make no mistake, every entry on my list is gross beyond words.

“Some may seem OK, but believe me – and I know – these are the most inhospitable places on the planet, and spending a single minute inside one would be unthinkable except in the direst of circumstances. more extreme.

“Each of them seems to attract audience members who haven’t yet mastered the basic art of ‘aiming’.

“After my many travels, I thought I had seen it all, with s**ters on stilts, sinks seemingly full of pee, and bathtubs seemingly used as makeshift bogs.

“But after enjoying some of the dirtiest sanitation facilities on the planet, the toilets in Tajikistan have to be the worst in the world – it’s the perfect hell hole.”

“With no toilet paper available, the builders conveniently built it with a fabric covering to provide wipe down functionality – and it seems the locals have taken full advantage of it!”

Mr Askey added: “While readers will no doubt find these dismal public toilets hilarious, it should be understood that they represent a significant and largely unnecessary health risk, which can be significantly reduced by supporting charities like ActionAid and the World Toilet Day.”

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